Category Archives: Tutorial

Craigslist Dining Chair Makeover

dining chair makeover

This has been a project at least a year in the making since I bought these really worn out dining chairs on craigslist for $40 for a set of 6.

dining chair nefore

The fabric was torn and the padding dry rotting. My kids had a field day pulling it apart every night at dinner. I had originally hoped to save the caned back but they were just too damaged. So for a year we sat on them and ate and thought about how to make them pretty again. Eventually I fell in love with the Summer Blooms in Navy fabric from Spoonflower and decided it would look amazing on the back of our dining chairs. And so the idea to pad the back of the chairs was born.

The first thing we did was remove the bottom cushions. Then using an exacto knife my husband cut away the caning.

removing caning

To make a foundation for our new chair back cushions we cut underlayment to fit the chair frame. Below you can see my husband tracing out the cuts using the back of the chair as a template,

redoing a chair back

We cut our two panels for each chair. One for the front and one for the back.

chair makeover for dining room

For the padding I used an old mattress topper that we had laying around. I used the wood backers we had cut as templates on the foam and fabric.

chair makeover

To create the front cushion I laid down a piece of fabric, the foam, then the backerboard. Using a pneumatic staple gun I started at the tops and bottom pulling the fabric as tight as possible. Then finishing all four sides.

dining room makeover

I did this for all 6 fronts and then all 6 backs. For the backs I replaced the  foam with a light batting. The back doesn’t really need batting; however, the white flowers on my fabric were somewhat opaque and I didn’t want the brown backer board to show through.

dining chair cushions

While I was putting the chair backs together I was also spray painting the chair frames white. I used a paint and primer in one to make it go quicker. Once the frames were dry we attached the new backs to the chair frames with the pneumatic staple gun. We attached the cushioned pieces one at a time, first the back then the front. When we were done the back looked perfect.

dining chair back

However, on the front we had to figure out how to cover not only the staples, but also the large gap created between the two backer pieces and the frame.

dining chair makeover

The solution was to used a large corded trim we found at Joanne’s fabric. I attached it using a hot glue gun.

dining chair trim

While I was finishing up the trim, Cody recovered the seat cushions. He kept the original foam cushion but covered them in an additional layer of heavy batting before covering them in the blue duck cloth we picked out. Again this was all attached with a pneumatic staple gun.

recovering a chair cushion

And finally we were all done!

dining chair after

They barely look like the same chairs anymore!

dining chair makeover

The fronts are covered in a navy blue duck cloth which were hoping will be durable for the kids. The back is just cotton but I love the unexpected floral pattern.

craigslist chair makeover

Total this makeover came in at about $20 a chair including the original purchase of the chairs. Hard to beat that!

chair makeover before and after

Stay tuned for our new dining table made from reclaimed wood and metal!

Built-ins in the Master Bedroom with an Ikea hack

We have done pretty much nothing to our master bedroom. The last time you even saw it was when we painted it about 2 years ago.

Grey and teal masterbedroom

It’s big and square and from the moment we first saw the room we knew we wanted to make it something special. We just had no idea how to do that. So we did nothing for 2 years while I thought about and pinned 1000’s of pins, then finally a picture of what I we could do formed in my head. We wanted something dramatic and moody, so we obviously started at Ikea. I know that doesn’t make any sense. You’re thinking “Ikea is light and airy”, but stay with me. We bought 2 Ikea Tarva dressers that we actually got at the Ikea family price of $65!

TARVA 3-drawer chest IKEA Made of solid wood, which is a durable and warm natural material.

We decided that these would make the perfect base for built-ins around our bed. We assembled them minus the legs which would have made them too high for a bedside table.

ikea tarva hack

We set the dressers onto a small 2×4 base then built book shelves to sit on top of them.

Ikea tarva hack

We built the book cases out of  primed pine 1x12s. The shelves are faced with primed pine 1 x2s.  Of course both electrical outlets on the wall were right behind the new dressers, so we installed new outlets at alarm clock height.

book cases in master  bedroom

The book shelves created 3 alcoves on the wall that we filled with a square wainscoting made out of primed pine 1×4’s. I love how much the molding sticks off the wall. It’s a very different look that the wainscoting we did in the foyer.

master bedroom wainscotting

The whole wall got new base boards including the dressers.

tarva bookcase

The final touch was crown molding and a whole lot of caulking. And that brings us to where we are today!

DIY wainscoting

If you’re wondering where the moodiness is it’s in the paint. The color is already going up on the wall and it’s absolutely phenomenal. I can’t wait to share it with you!

And here’s a reminder of what the room looked like when we bought the house.

Master bedroom

How I pick paint colors and why you should never get paint color matched

pick the perfect color

Will you pick paint colors for me? It’s the most common question I get from friends and family. I honestly love picking out paint colors but I’ve come to realize that many people are paralyzed by fear of picking the wrong color. There is no fool proof way of picking the perfect color. Even I’ve been known to be a shade off a time or two (I’m looking at you laundry room), but for the most part I love the very first color I pick.

So I’m going to let you in on my process for picking the perfect color: Pinterest!

I know it’s not exactly a secret, but I’m going to walk you through how you can use Pinterest to narrow down the perfect wall color for you room.

Pick a color:

If you haven’t zeroed in on exact color yet, then spend a little time using Pinterest’s search function to help you out here. Below is a screen shot of what I got when I searched “best paint colors”:

how to pick a paint color

Research your color:

You wouldn’t buy a new car without doing a little research first would you? Same goes with paint colors. After all painting your walls is a huge commitment. Maybe not monetarily, but time wise and aesthetically it is going to make a huge impact. Do yourself a favor and don’t skip this step. After playing around on Pinterest for a while I knew I wanted a really natural griege for the family room, so I inserted that into the search function:

picking greige paint

As you can see I found literally thousands of pictures of rooms painted in a griege color including many links to blogger’s and designer’s favorite griege colors.  This is where you let other people’s experience work for you. Look over the pictures, see how the colors actually look in the rooms, and narrow it down to your favorite colors.  The color that I found myself pinning over and over again was Benjamin Moore’s Revere Pewter, so that is where I started.

Pick out paint chips:

Hopefully by now you have a least one inspiration color to start with. Now go to that paint retailer and find the right paint chip. After you have found your inspiration color, grab a couple more that are in the same shade range (think above, below, left, and right of your inspiration). Since my inspiration was Benjamin Moore, I also headed over to Lowe’s and picked up some Valspar and Olympic paint chips that were in the same range. It’s better at this point to have too many choices than not enough.

Just a sample of the chips we picked up for our foyer makeover:

how to pick a paint color

 

Hold up paint chips in the room:

Just because a color looked great online doesn’t actually mean it will work in your room. Now is the time to put your room to the test. Hold up the chips in the room you wish to paint. I like to hold it up against the trim color to get an idea of how it will all look together. Also consider holding them up against anything else permanent such as the flooring or brick. I like to start with my inspiration color and work out from there.  Also consider all the different lighting in the room. Try looking at the sample with lights on and off, in natural light and in the darkest area of the room.

Revere Pewter actually made it to our short list, but in the end we decided on Olympic’s Grey Ghost. I couldn’t exactly pin point why we choose this color. This is where you just go with your gut.

family room makeover

Choose lighter and muddier:

You’ll probably be able to narrow down you color choices pretty quickly, but what do you do when you find yourself stuck between two or three choices? My recommendation is go for the lighter choice because the color will always look more saturated once it’s on the wall. Also go for the one with more brown, grey, or beige in it. These tones tend to be softer on the eyes and more flattering over all. If you’re still stuck, ask for a second opinion. I will sometimes agonize over a color choice for days and when I finally ask my husband he picks one in 2 seconds.

tv console makeover

Confidently buy your paint:

Go yon, ye paint color expert and buy your paint confidently knowing that it’s going to look great in your room.

Wait! Can I save money by getting an expensive brand color matched?

Yes, but don’t do it. Having a paint color mixed is an exact science. The paint chip tells the paint mixer exactly how much of each pigment to put in for each type of paint. When you have a color paint matched the computer is just making a best guess, and I promise you won’t be happy with the result. Besides, after going through all the trouble of picking the perfect color, why tempt fate with a knock off. I always buy the same brand of paint that the paint chip goes with. Sometimes I win and pick a cheaper paint and sometimes I have to chalk up the extra money for premium paint. Also, down the road if you need more paint mixed there is a greater likelihood of the colors not matching if you had it color matched the first time.

whole house paint pallet

 

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Make custom curtains from store bought panels

Last time I updated you on our master bedroom was when we painted it like 2 years ago. Well, we recently decided that we needed new curtains for our master bedroom; and I promptly fell in love with these ones from Restoration Hardware for $2000.

restoration hardware curtains Ya, you read that right. $2000 for 4 panels. You’re probably laughing as hard as my husband did right now.  When I started searching around for something similar but cheaper though I came up empty. That’s when I started playing with the idea of making my own.  A couple of Youtube videos later and I convinced myself that I definitely did NOT want to make curtains from scratch. Damn that is a lot of work and still pricey.

That’s when I decided I would just alter some store bought curtains into custom curtains.  Specifically the Ikea Ingert curtains which are $40 a pair. Ikea curtains are great for altering. Remember when I added stripes to our family room curtains?

ikea ingert I obsessively stalked custom curtains on Pinterest and made of list of what I wanted my curtains to have.

  1. 2 finger pinch pleat
  2. Black out lining
  3. Hang heavy and straight

And here’s the materials I used:

The first step was ironing out the curtains. This took forever.

ikea ingert

Next, I laid out the ironed curtain on the floor and placing the wrong sides together put the ironed blackout liner on top. The blackout liner is slightly smaller than the curtain. custom ingert curtains

I pinned the two pieces together along the top and two sides. Then using the stitch witchery and iron I attached the two pieces together.

diy custom curtains

I attached all 3 sides together using stitch witchery leaving the bottom open.  Next, I made the pinch pleats. This is where you just have to play with the fabric to figure out what you want. Once I figured out how many pleats I wanted I pinned them together and hand sewed them.

diy pinch pleats

Here’s what they looked like from the front.

make pinch pleats

Once the pleats where completed I hung the panel from the new rods. Make sure that the rods are at the proper height and you like the way the panels hang from the rings. I played a while with this step as well.

Once the panels were hung I inserted pins where I wanted the hem to be. For me this was just gracing the floor. I then took the panels down and cut the fabric about 6 inches from the hem. I folded over the bottom by 1 in then ironed then folded the fabric to the hem and attached it to the blackout liner using the stitch witchery.

custom curtains from store bought panels

Before closing up the bottom I also inserted a drapery weight into the bottom hem on each side of the panel.

Here you can see how the new panels compare to the old ones.  Not only are they longer but they hanger straighter and stay open wider.

make custom curtains

Here’s a close up of the pleating.

diy dutch pleat

And here they are all done. I apologize for the terrible lighting. Taking pictures of windows is difficult.

dit custom curtains

And this gives you an idea of how much light the black out liners block.

add a black out liner

These pictures don’t so the curtains any justice, but we love how much more mature they make the room feel.

And as for cost:

Panels: $80

Blackout liners: $50

Everything else: $18

Total: $148

So while these curtains took me forever to  make (I did the work over a couple of weeks) the savings (over $1800!) sure made it worth it!

We have more plans for the master bedroom coming up!

 

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Carpet to Wood stair makeover reveal

carpet to wood stair makeover It’s finally time for the kitchen stair makeover reveal! Many of us are stuck with builder’s grade carpeted stairs, but that doesn’t mean we have to live with them! For about $150 we were able to transform our boring old stairs into beautiful custom looking wood stairs! I already shared with you how we built the stair treads ourselves, so let’s get straight to the pretty pictures!

P.s you can see all my inspiration for this project here.

wood stairwell makeover

Ohhhh…….

stairway makeover from carpet to wood

Ahhhh…….

covnert carpet to wood stairs

So shiny!

ebony stained handrail

And my favorite part! Before and after pictures!

stair makeover

The view from the pantry…..

stairs before and after And a picture from before we even moved in…..

stair makeover before and after These are the stairs that go from our kitchen to our play room (room over the garage), so they are slightly shorter than average stairs. We used this project as a practice run for our foyer stairs which will hopefully be getting the same treatment before Christmas!

Foyer

 

UPDATE 2017: The foyer stairs are finally done! Check them out here!

 

If you were just here for the pretty pictures this is your queue to leave. Now on to some of the more technical aspects of this makeover…..

The stair risers are made from stain grade plywood (same thing we made the foyer wainscoting, island cover panel, and faux chimney box from). After each piece was cut to size I rolled on two coats of primer and two coats of white paint each. I spread them out on table in the dining room while painting.

After they were dry Cody used a pneumatic nail gun to attach them to each riser. You can see them going up below……

making stair risers Painting the bannisters was a major pain in the butt. They each got two coats of primer and two coats of paint multiplied by 4 sides since I could only paint 1 side at a time. Even though I put on very light coats I still wound up with a lot of drips. They are still not perfect, but as long as you don’t look too close you won’t notice.

When we do the foyer steps, I am planning on spraying the banisters, so I’ll let you know how that goes.

painting banisters

The part of this project that wound up being the most difficult was staining to newel post and handrails. I already had Polyshades Classic Black* in the garage and I devised this perfect plan of just giving everything a light sanding followed by a quick wipe down with a TSP substitute*. Then magically I would just glaze the handrails with the black stain.  Well I tried that then sat back for 3 days waiting for the stain to dry to no avail. I don’t know if I didn’t mix the stain well enough or it was too humid in the garage, but my plan definitely wasn’t working.

*These links are affiliate links. I include them as a reference for the products we use and hope they are helpful to you; however, if you make a purchase we may make a small commission.

ebony stained handrail So, on to plan B which involved using a chemical stripper* and stripper after wash* to remove both the black and original finish. The good news is that after being stripped the ebony stain adhered beautifully. I gave it all two coats of the stain. It already had gloss polyurethane in it, so there was no need for a finish.  The hand rails are my favorite part of the design. I love how glossy they are. It’s like jewelry for the stairs!
stair makeover We finished each riser with decorative molding under each step. Before we put the molding on the steps looks sort of blah. In fact I kept calling them Ikea steps (as in perfectly functional but white and boring). The molding made all the difference. In the picture above you can see the top riser without molding.
So, there it is! I hope this reveal was as exciting for you as it was for us! I can’t begin to tell you how nice it is to look into the kitchen and not have the stairwell acting as a black hole/energy suck in the room design. In fact, there is actually only one more project (built in banquette) left to do in the kitchen before we can call the room done.
One last question! How do you feel about a runner on the stairs? We’re still torn on the idea and would love to hear your input!
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How to make wood stairs treads for cheap

DIY stair treads If you’ve been following me on Facebook or Instagram then you already know that we have been tackling a makeover on our kitchen stairwell. I originally intended to just make one big stair makeover reveal post, but then I realized that it would be a ridiculously long post and pretty boring for those of you who just want to see the pretty “after” pictures. So, instead I decided that this post  would be about the more technical aspects of building new wood stair treads and finishing them. Look for the whole stair makeover reveal later this week.

If you are just joining us this is what we started with:

kitchen stairs before I had hoped that when we ripped up the carpet that we would find nice wood stair treads that we could refinish underneath, but like many 1980’s era track homes we found particle board instead. I was pretty bummed, but Cody was actually relieved. He had already decided that building new treads would actually be less work than trying to revive old ones full of staples and nails.

Now, you can buy pine stair treads at Home Depot for about $10.64 a piece.  These treads are basically a pine board that has been routed to be round on the front of the tread. We needed 10 treads, so that would have brought us to $106.40. That’s not terrible, but there were a couple of issues with these treads. 1) they are only 1 in think which we decided would look pretty puny once installed and 2) ours stairs have exposed sides which means we still would have had to route some of the boards.

I found these nice chunky 2 in stairs treads, but at $123.75 a piece for “paint-grade” ($1237.50 total!) they totally blew the budget. So, we decided to just make our own stair treads.

Building stair treads

The treads are built from 2″x12″ pine boards that were 12′ long.  Look for boards with the least amount of knots and that are not warped.

make your own stair treads Cody started by securing a 12′ board to a table and routing the front of each board with roundover bit.

routing stair treads Here’s an idea of what it will look like when it’s done. Don’t worry about any imperfections now. Those will be sanded out later. If any of your steps are open on the side (like our bottom 5) you will also have to route the side of those steps.

how to make your own stair treads Once the routing was complete, Cody used a table saw to cut 1″ off the back of each board to make the steps the depth that we wanted.

how to make stair treads Finally, he measured and cut each board to the appropriate tread length using a chop saw.

how to make your own steps Cody measured and cut each step individually as there were some slight variations is lengths. We dry fitted the steps as we went to make sure everything fit perfect. The bottom 5 steps also required some fancy cuts to account for the newel post, exposed sides, and hand rails.

how to make wood stair treads Finally, we sanded the crap of of each tread with an electric sander to get the boards as smooth as possible.

Staining and Installing

We are finally at my favorite part: staining the treads! I knew from the beginning that I wanted to stain them Mission Oak. It’s my favorite stain color and the same color we used on our industrial console table.  Cody didn’t want to take any chances with the color though so I tested out a few options we had lying around on a leftover piece of pine.

staing wood stair treads Our goal was to match the laminate floors in the kitchen as much as possible. The dark walnut (same as we used on the kitchen counters) and the Jacobean were both a little too dark and didn’t have enough of a honey tone as I would have liked. We decided that mission oak was the winner, but we didn’t want the kind with the polyurethane in it (which is what I had on hand), so off to the store I went only to find out that Mission Oak is only sold as a Polyshades. Sigh….. So, I scoured the shelves for a color that was the most similar to Mission Oak and settled on Special Walnut. I tested it on the pine and we were sold!

Before I started staining the treads I removed any dust with cheesecloth then applied a coat of wood conditioner.  Wood conditioner allows the stain to penetrate the wood more evenly. I always use it when staining a highly visible area such as a table top or in this case stair treads.

pre stain on table I allowed the wood conditioner to dry to the touch then using an old rag applied the first coat of stain making sure to go in the direction of the grain. I set up a staining station in the dining room because it was too humid in the garage to get the stain to dry properly.

staining stair treads I applied two coats of stain over the course of one day than allowed the treads to dry overnight before applying the sealer. Finally the treads got two coats of Pro finisher Polyurethane for Floors. I choose a satin finish to keep the treads looking a little rustic like our floors, plus they are easier to keep clean. I sanded between coats then let them dry overnight before installing the treads.

To install the treads Cody started by applying liquid nails to the stair braces (just made up that term). We did this to reduce noticeable nails on the treads and to keep the steps from wiggling.

installing wood stair treads Next, Cody shot in about four finishing nails on the sides of the treads. This helps them stay in place as the glue dries. We opted not to fill in the nail holds as they were hardly noticeable and added a little more rustic glamor to the steps.

installing stair treads And with that we had working steps again! Building our own steps cost about $100. The same as the off the shelf Home Depot treads except ours our 1 3/4 in thick (that’s $1100 less than the 2 in treads we found online!)

Update: The stairs are done! Check out the complete reveal here!

Update 2017: We used the same treads for our foyer stairs. Check out the whole makeover here!

 

Has anyone else tackled a stairway makeover? Do you prefer wood or carpet stairs?

Outdoor Reclaimed Wood Floating Buffet

reclaimed wood outdoor buffet I’m finally ready to share our first real completed project on the screened in porch with you. It’s a floating buffet made out of reclaimed wood that actually hinges up for storage. And the best part is that is cost us basically nothing (we only had to buy the hinges!) Let’s back track a little to where this project started.

porch before There was this nice empty spot between the french doors and the windows on our porch that was just begging for a table. And there was the nice pile of wood sitting in our backyard from when we took down the old play set.

reclaimed wood We decided to build a rustic industrial buffet that would float or hang off the wall and could be hinged up for storage in the off season. It’s super easy to construct, but I’ll break it down for you in a couple of pictures.

rustic outdoor buffett We started by picking out 3 of the best pieces of reclaimed wood then screwed in 3 pieces of scrap wood vertically to hold the table top together.

industrial pallet buffet Next we added three more pieces to the underneath of the table.

reclaimed wood table Finally we finished off all of the edges with cedar left over from the reclaimed window pane window box project.

reclaimed wood buffet In order to secure the table to the vinyl siding we added a piece of wood at the height of the table making sure to screw it into studs. I then painted the white board the same color as the siding.

reclaimed wood outdoor buffet The table is hung  from two places. Its secured directly to the house by two hinges that are hidden underneath the table top and from two chains that we simply screwed into studs behind the siding. The chains were also left over from the window boxes.

Outdoor wood buffet for porch This view really allows you to see the character of the wood. We sanded it down lightly to remove the dirt and grime then I finished it with a coat of coconut oil (because that’s all I had).

DIY reclaimed wood industrial table It’s really amazing how much more functional the porch is now. We love being able to put drinks and snacks on the buffet while we’re entertaining guests outside. It’s also a much nicer view now from the outdoor furniture. Remember this is what is looked like before:

porch before And now!

Porch after buffet You might also notice that the doors are now the same color as our shutters and the trim got a nice white paint job. The windows also received some window treatments (more on that soon). For now please ignore that tiny outdated light fixture and the terrible metal storm shutters. Those are both updates for another day.

We’re continuing to finish up the trim on the outside of the porch as well as lay a new floor, so look for more porch updates soon!

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A new idea for old windows

I’ve been teasing all of you about a new outdoor upcycle project for a while, and I am so excited it is finally done! It was actually a really easy project to do, we’ve just been extra busy lately! Well without further ado here it is:

what to do with old windows Let’s take a quick step back and I’ll tell you how this project came into fruition.  I had two problems that had been plaguing me:

  1. I had two old windows from our kitchen just sitting on the patio begging for a new life.
  2. The view into our back yard is ugly! There are no gardens and because we have plans to gut the whole area and put in a pool (in like 3 years) we don’t want to waste the time or money to install any.

Here’s the view from our screened in porch.

backyard before I was stumped with what to do with this space until I saw this pin! All of my problems seemed suddenly solved. I had a purpose for my old windows and a way to add color and dimension to our old shed,  I was lazy and didn’t take pictures of the whole process but basically we built a box out of cedar and attached it to the front of the windows.

hanging window boxes We drilled hooks into the overhang on the shed and hung the windows with chain. The chain is simply attached to the window with a screw.

faux windows And here is a window going up.

window boxes OK, you caught me. I really just wanted to show off my hot hubby. But you have to admit that the new (old) faux windows really jazz up the old shed.

how to make window boxes If you want my secret for making window boxes look lush and full right away check out this post.

flowers in window boxes And look how much the view from the porch has improved!

faux windows If you want more window box inspiration don’t miss my 17 dreamy window boxes you can easily create yourself and my trick to getting gorgeous window boxes.

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$11 Pantry Makeover

budget pantry makeover with baskets All of those beautiful and organized pantries on Pinterest (like this one, this one, and this one) had me itching to get my hands on ours. When we originally painted the kitchen, I painted the outside of the pantry doors and replaced the knobs, but the inside was 100% original to the house including the peachy orange paint that used to be in the whole kitchen. A pantry makeover wasn’t exactly high on the priority list so from the get-go I knew there were two driving principals for this projects: I had to sneak it in between our higher priority porch makeover and it needed to cost basically nothing.

problems with the pantry

 

Besides the horrible paint color I also had these problems to contend with:

  1. Dog food storage that didn’t fit under the shelf.
  2. Brooms and mops that flopped all over the place.
  3. Potatoes and onions rolling wherever they wished.
  4. Dark wood and dated striped contact paper.
  5. No storage for paper products.
  6. No rhyme or reason to the placement of any products.

Painting the pantry

 

 

pantry makeover

 

To start with I removed all of the shelves and ripped off the old contact paper. It came off easy enough, but was still time consuming. I originally planned on recovering the shelves with the fun teal and white chevron contact paper (affiliate), but not only would I have needed about 5 rolls, but according to the reviews the dark wood would have shown through the paper, so I decided to save some money and paint them instead. Pantry makeover Next, I cleaned the shelves with my tsp substitute (affiliate), then primed them once and painted them bright white.  The shelves were actually suppose to be the same mint green as the dining room, but  Cody took it upon himself to paint them while I was at work; and I just didn’t have the energy to re-paint them. While the shelves were getting painted I also painted the pantry walls white (Valspar Ultra white in semi-gloss).

painting a pantry

See how much brighter it looks already? You can also see that we bumped up the bottom shelf up about an inch so that the dog food storage could easily slide under the shelf now.  It’s hard to tell in this picture but I also painted the fronts of the shelves the mint green (B.M. Palladian) to give the space a little bit of charm.

wax shelves Before I started placing items back on the shelves I rubbed the shelves down with Paste Finishing Wax to make sure the paint didn’t get chipped up by cans or baskets being dragged across the shelves.

Pantry Labels

DIY pantry lables Now that the pantry was painted, it was time for some organization, and I knew I wanted super cute labels for the baskets I had rounded up (here’s similar ones from one of my affiliates). I found these unpainted clipboards and chalkboards for $.88 a piece at A.C. Moore.

DIY pantry tags They were a little plain, so I painted the clip boards the same mint as the shelf fronts, and gave the chalkboard a quick swipe of my favorite stain (Minwax Mission oak- affiliate).

make your own pantry lables Next, I hot glued the clip boards and chalkboard to the front of the baskets. I also used a white paint pen to label the chalk board.

pantry lables The most time consuming part of this project was creating the labels for the chalk boards. Mostly because I spent an hour deciding on fonts (something I’ll save you the hassle of). I made these in MS Word by creating a rounded rectangle slightly smaller than the clipboard. Next, I came up with a cutesy saying to describe the contents of each basket. The saying is in Lane-upper font while the contents are written in Moonflower bold. Once I got the look I was going for I printed them onto card stock and cut them out.

DIY pantry lables Here’s how the labels look all put together. Aren’t they cute? P.S. all the baskets were orphans I had laying around the house after our move.

pantry lables For the produce baskets, I made circle labels in the same moonflower font that I attached to the baskets using old clothespins that had been painted mint on the front.

clothespin pantry lables One thing I really love about the clothes pins and clipboards is that it is super easy to change out the labels as our needs change.

budget pantry makeover with baskets And Voila! It’s done. I spent some time moving things around to get the right feel/look, but I absolutely love it!

broom holder pantry If you are wondering where I spent the $11 it was mostly on this new broom and mop organizer which I bought at Target for $8.98 (here’s a similar one from my affiliate) I can’t tell you how nice it is to open the pantry and not have to fear getting hit in the head by a falling broom.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

As I mentioned before all the baskets were cast-offs from our last house that had yet to find a place in the new house. The paint was also all leftover from other projects. OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

I love that everything now has it’s own place, and that like items are now grouped together in the baskets. pantry makeover I’d still like to create labels for the glass jars holding my tea. Maybe something like this.

before and after pantry makeover Overall, I’d say not bad for $11! Actually I’m so in love with my work that I keep opening the pantry and staring at it, Even more surprising is that 2 weeks after taking these pictures, it’s still just as organized.

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“Hey there beautiful” glitter art

hey there beautiful artwork

When I first envisioned a vignette for the foyer I knew I wanted a welcoming piece of typographical art. Then I saw Stephanie Creekmur’s “Hey Y’all” gold print and fell in love. You may remember it from my Industrial Chic foyer mood board.  I was hoping that the sophisticated and shimmery gold would help balance out the raw metal and wood of the industrial table.  After showing it to my mom, she convinced me we’re not southern enough to pull off “y’all” (despite the fact we live in Virginia and I use the term all the time), so I decided to make my own version.

I wanted an uplifting and welcoming phrase to great visitors, and I eventually settled on “Hey there beautiful” for no other reason that it makes me happy. Using PicMonkey I created the text the way I wanted it to look.

picmonkey artwork I printed it onto card stock in a golden color to ensure that no color would bleed through the glitter. Next, using a fine tip paint brush I painted matte modge podge (affiliate) over the letters.

hey there beautiful I did one letter at a time then sprinkled extra fine gold glitter (affiliate) over it. I continued going one letter at a time while going back and filling in bare spots.

typographical artwork This is a super easy project. Just make sure to use the finest tip brush you can find. I actually used two different ones to get the wider and thinner parts of the letters. I let it dry for 2 hours before framing.

hey there beautiful artwork I got the frame from Target on clearance for $7. I love the juxtaposition of the slightly rustic frame with the gold glitter.

how to make a rustic table And the foyer is officially done! I love how the vignette looks paired with the wainscoting behind it. And doesn’t it look just like my inspiration board? I still need to get something for the owl vase. I’m thinking a cotton branch.  The final touch to this space will  be the stairs makeover which will hopefully be later this summer.

Anyone else using glitter to light up their house?

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